Retailers’ will live and die by the ethical practices of their suppliers

Retailers’ will live and die by the ethical practices of their suppliers

The quest for profit is the lifeblood of global commerce. Retailers, like any organisation, are hungry, short-term cash seekers who must pay their costs, reward shareholders and fund the next marketing campaign to acquire more customers.

What’s left over – profit, long term and short term – is the single true marker of corporate success, and as we know, retailers and suppliers are equally guilty of doing almost anything to get it – even if that means turning a blind eye to corruption and inhumane recruitment practices going on somewhere in their supply chain.

Irresponsible Recruitment – UK Migrant Workers are Paying the Price

Irresponsible Recruitment – UK Migrant Workers are Paying the Price

The summer of 2016 has seen at least two big recruitment scandals involving migrant workers: Sports Direct and Byron Burgers.  So-called ‘immigration raids’, in which migrant workers are arrested, detained or deported on the premise that they are working illegally in the UK, are proving a controversial method of cracking down on breaches of immigration and employment regulation. 

Whilst there are many cases where migrant workers produce falsified documentation to seek work in Britain, the responsibility still lies with the employer to protect both the business against illegal immigrant recruitment and overseas workers who do have the right to work in the UK.

We take a deeper look into the very worst recruitment practices.

Supply Chains of Even the Most Ethical Companies can be Breeding Grounds for Modern Slavery

Supply Chains of Even the Most Ethical Companies can be Breeding Grounds for Modern Slavery

Supply chains in this day and age are complex, usually with multiple inter-connected strands spanning continents. This means that things can be distorted when looking down from the top - especially with regard to recruitment methods and working conditions. Those at the top of the chain (usually the retailer) have no idea what is going on within the separate strands of their supply chain in relation to these operations and practices because they tend to focus on production levels and profit over fair worker treatment.