Three Steps to Making Supply Chain Transparency Meaningful

Three Steps to Making Supply Chain Transparency Meaningful

It has now been over a year since the Modern Slavery Act came into effect, calling for any company earning more than £36m per year to produce a report outlining its commitment to eradicating human trafficking and slavery in their supply chain. 

There are several interesting points here. Firstly, the legislation doesn’t demand that UK companies comply with Section 54, insofar as there are no consequences for not submitting a statement. Neither are their penalties for stating that nothing is being done to banish modern slavery in their business.

Excel in Your Modern Slavery Report 2017 and Unlock a Better Business

Excel in Your Modern Slavery Report 2017 and Unlock a Better Business

Last year, the Modern Slavery Act came into British law to address heightened levels of human trafficking and the treatment of workers in the UK. Prime Minister Theresa May’s intention was to “send the strongest possible signal that victims were not alone and that those responsible for this vile exploitation would face justice.”

Approaching the end of 2016, we have now seen published links to most of the hundreds of statements made to date. So, taking inspiration from John Lewis and other firms that embraced the spirit of Section 54, we’ve narrowed down some top tips for excelling in next year’s Modern Slavery Report.